Canada: Ontario delays ban on vaping in public spaces

A bill that is being proposed by Ontario’s Health Ministry would regulate vaping in the same way as smoking, hence placing restrictions on where vapers can use their devices and also on how the products can be marketed and sold. E-cigarette retailers fear that the proposed regulation would prohibit their staff from showing their customers how the products work and not allow their customers to try samples of e-liquids.

Customers need employees to “walk them through how to use the product,” said Maria Papaioannoy, a co-owner of vape shops Ecig Flavorium. “No one expects to go buy technology without an opportunity to get educated on how to use it,” she added during a news conference at the Ontario Legislature last week.

Adding another a barrier against smokers wanting to switch

This legislation puts “really huge barriers in the way of the majority of smokers who say they want to quit.”

Renowned public health expert and chair of the advisory committee of the University of Ottawa’s Centre for Health Law, Policy and Ethics, David Sweanor, said that this bill would work against the interests of public health. This legislation puts “really huge barriers in the way of the majority of smokers who say they want to quit,” he said, adding, “We shouldn’t be doing that for a product that is killing so many people,” said Sweanor. “We need to offer [smokers] something that reduces the risk.”

 

Sweanor has been striving to develop tobacco-control laws in Canada and around the world for the last 30 years, and has received the prestigious Ottawa’s Outstanding Individual Philanthropist award in 2016. In an article he wrote on Troy Media last August, the professor said that sadly many smokers have been facing significant obstacles by the authorities just to be able to obtain and use safer alternatives such as electronic cigarettes and smokeless tobacco.

“Canadian regulation has not only failed to adapt to and facilitate the transition to these massively lower-risk products, but hampered their development, marketing and accessibility. Smoke-free products could not only dramatically reduce the disease burden but could facilitate total nicotine abstinence for those who wish it.”David Sweanor, Professor at the Faculty of Law and the Centre for Health Law Policy and Ethics, University of Ottawa

“Canadian regulation has not only failed to adapt to and facilitate the transition to these massively lower-risk products, but hampered their development, marketing and accessibility. Smoke-free products could not only dramatically reduce the disease burden but could facilitate total nicotine abstinence for those who wish it,” pointed out Sweanor at the time.

Read Further: CBC

Cigarette use steadily declining in Canada, yet ‘no-smoking efforts’ persist

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